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MPCT marks ‘Time To Talk’ Day 2020

Time To Talk Day brings the nation together (check out the hashtag #timetotalk) to get talking and break the silence around mental health problems.
Too often, people who experience a mental health problem are also expected to take the lead on talking about mental health in the wider sense. Time To Talk Day encourages everyone to talk about mental health.

Mental health problems affect one in four of us yet people are still afraid to talk about it. For people with mental health problems not being able to talk about it can be one of the worst parts of the illness. So by getting people talking about mental health we can break down stereotypes, improve relationships, aid recovery and take the stigma out of something that affects us all.

Whether you’re a concerned friend or worried for your own health, there are ways to kick start that conversation.

Below are 5 tips from Time To Change that will guide you to make sure you’re approaching it in a helpful way.

  1. Ask questions and listen
    Asking questions can give the person space to express how they’re feeling and what they’re going through, and it will help you to understand their experience better. Try to ask questions that are open and not leading or judgemental – such as “how does that affect you” or “what does it feel like?”
  2. Think about the time & place
    Sometimes it’s easier to talk side by side rather than face to face. So, if you do talk in person, you might want to chat while you are doing something else. You could start a conversation when you’re walking, cooking or stuck in traffic. However, don’t let the search for the perfect place put you off!
  3. Don’t try & fix it
    It can be hard to see someone you care about having a difficult time but try to resist the urge to offer quick fixes to what they’re going through. Learning to manage or recover from a mental health problem can be a long journey, and they’ve likely already considered lots of different tools and strategies. Just talking can be really powerful, so unless they’ve asked for advice directly, it might be best just to listen.
  4. Treat them the same
    When someone has a mental health problem, they’re still the same person as they were before. And that means when a friend or loved one opens up about mental health, they don’t want to be treated any differently. If you want to support them, keep it simple. Do the things you’d normally do.
  5. Be patient
    No matter how hard you try, some people might not be ready to talk about what they’re going through. That’s ok – the fact that you’ve tried to talk to them about it may make it easier for them to open up another time.

And there are lots of things you can do to support them even if you’re not talking:

  • Doing things together
  • Sending a text to let them know you’re thinking of them
  • Offering to help with day-to-day tasks

Some helpful links here for you too.

https://www.mind.org.uk/

https://www.time-to-change.org.uk/

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